Alexander Arutunian

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Alexander Arutunian in 2008

Alexander Arutiunian (born September 23, 1920, Yerevan; died March 28, 2012) was an Armenian composer and pianist, widely-known particularly for his Trumpet concerto[1]. He was awarded by the State Prizes of USSR (1949) and Armenia (1970), People's Artist of the USSR (1970) and Armenian SSR (1964) honorary titles, "St Mesrop Mashtots" and "Khorenatsi" Armenian medals, "Alexandrov" Gold medal (1976), "St Sahak and St Mesrop" Order by Holy Etchmiadzin (2004).

He graduated from the Music Conservatory of Yerevan, then he studied composition with Genrikh Litinsky. After graduation he returned to Yerevan to teach at the local Conservatory and later he became artistic director of the Armenian Philarmonic Orchestra.

In 1948 he was awarded the USSR State Prize for the Motherland cantata, a graduation piece he wrote as a student at the Moscow Conservatory. He has continued to win acclaim at home and abroad for his works, many of which are quickened by the folk traditions of Armenian music.

Some of Arutiunian's works for wind instruments, notably the 1950 concerto for trumpet, the concerto for tuba, and the brass quintet Armenian Scenes, have secured their place in the international repertory, having been performed by conductors such as Valeri Gergiev, who has recorded his Symphony for large orchestra, composed in 1957 with the Symphony orchestra of the Russian All-Union Radio. In 1988, he composed his Violin Concerto "Armenia-88".

Filmography[change | change source]

Music for Films[change | change source]

  • Nahapet (1977) (as Life Triumphs in USA)
  • Za chas do rassveta (An Hour Before the Dawn, 1973, TV)
  • Sirtn e yergum (The Heart Sings, 1957)
  • Urvakannere heranum en lernerits (Ghosts Leave the Peaks, 1955)
  • Aleph, lectures contades (2000) Italian TV episode (soundtrack: "Concerto for trombone and orchestra")

As Actor[change | change source]

  • Lalvari vorskane (Lalvar Hunter, 1967) as Zako

Other websites[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. CLASSICAL MUSIC AND DANCE GUIDE, The New York Times, August 4, 2000