Ali Shariati

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Ali Shariati

Ali Shariati Mazinani (1933-1977) (Persian: علی شريعتی مزینانی) or Shariati was an Iranian Muslim philosopher, sociologist, poet and writer.

Shariati's life[change | change source]

Shariati was born in 1933 in Mazinan, Iran.He stuided sociology in the University of Paris.He returned to Iran in 1964. When he returned to Iran, the Shah regime arrested and imprisoned him for political reasons. He was released in 1965. Shariati began teaching at the University of Mashhad.He began lecturing at the Hosseiniye Ershad institute in 1967. The Shah regime, arrested him again. And when he was freed in 1975, he was not allowed to teach or publish anything. Shariati decided to leave the country for England. Three weeks later he died in Southampton.He was buried in Damascus,Syria.

Shariati's most important books[change | change source]

  1. Hajj (The Pilgrimage)
  2. Where Shall We Begin?
  3. Mission of a Free Thinker
  4. The Free Man and Freedom of the Man
  5. Extraction and Refinement of Cultural Resources
  6. Martyrdom (book)
  7. Arise and Bear Witness
  8. Ali
  9. An approach to Understanding Islam
  10. A Visage of Prophet Muhammad
  11. A Glance of Tomorrow's History
  12. Reflections of Humanity
  13. A Manifestation of Self-Reconstruction and Reformation
  14. Selection and/or Election
  15. Norouz, Declaration of Iranian's Livelihood, Eternity
  16. Expectations from the Muslim Woman
  17. Horr (Battle of Karbala)
  18. Abu-Dahr
  19. Hossein Heir of Adam
  20. Islamology
  21. Red Shi'ism vs. Black Shi'ism
  22. Jihad and Shahadat
  23. Reflections of a Concerned Muslim on the Plight of Oppressed People
  24. A Message to the Enlightened Thinkers
  25. Art Awaiting the Saviour
  26. Fatemeh is Fatemeh
  27. The Philosophy of Supplication
  28. The Fall
  29. One, in front of it,Zeros to eternity
  30. Father,mother,we are culprits
  31. The Tale, My brother
  32. The Three Idols
  33. History of Civilization
  34. Man and Islam - see chapter "Modern Man and His Prisons"
  35. Religion versus Religion

External links[change | change source]