Allotrope

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Graphite is one allotrope of carbon
Diamond is another allotrope of carbon

An allotrope is another form of a substance. The substance is very similar but the structure of the substance affects the chemical and physical properties. The difference is very subtle but it can have large effects. Any of two or more physical forms in which an element can exist: diamond and graphite are allotropes of carbon

An allotrope is said to be each of the two or more different physical forms in which an element can exist, which might be close or distant in similar. The best examples of allotropes are charcoal, graphite and diamonds, which are allotropes of carbon.

Any of two or more forms of the same chemical element. They may have different arrangements of atoms in crystals of the solid—for example, graphite and diamond for carbon—or different numbers of atoms in their molecules—for example, ordinary oxygen (O) and ozone (O). Other elements that have allotropes include tin, sulfur, antimony, arsenic, selenium, and phosphorus.

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