Alluvial fan

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A big alluvial fan across the mountain ranges of Xinjiang.
Alluvial fan in southern Iran.

An alluvial fan is a fan-shaped deposit of soil and rocks. It forms where a fast-flowing river spreads out over a flat plain. They are usually found in between mountain ranges that are crumbling away. If it rains a lot, the fan area will usually flood.[1][2]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. Cazanacli, Dan; Paola, Chris; Parker, Gary (2002). "Experimental Steep, Braided Flow: Application to Flooding Risk on Fans". Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 128 (3): 322. doi:10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9429(2002)128:3(322) .
  2. Committee on Alluvial Fan Flooding, Water Science and Technology Board, Commission on Geosciences, Environment, and Resources, National Research Council. (1996). Alluvial fan flooding. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press. ISBN 0-309-05542-3 .

Other websites[change | change source]

     . http://erode.evsc.virginia.edu/papers/moore_fans_2004JE002352.pdf.
  • [1] Irrigation in the alluvial fan of Punata, Bolivia
  • [2] Irrigation in the alluvial fan of Garmsar, Iran
  • [3] Flood recession cropping in the alluvial fan of Okavango, Botswana
  • [4] Irrigation in alluvial fans in Baluchistan
  • Irrigation of alluvial fans