Biplane

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Reproduction of a Sopwith Camel biplane flown by Lt. George A. Vaughn Jr., 17th Aero Squadron

A biplane is a Fixed-wing aircraft that is heavier than air but can fly. Biplanes are special because they have two fixed wings.[1] Biplanes have a stronger structure but they produce more drag than normal fixed-wing aircraft. Biplanes can usually have more lift than similar monoplanes, but also create more drag. In the biplane set-up, the lower wing is often attached to the body of the aircraft and the top wing is raised above. Almost all biplanes also have a tail wing.

Famous biplanes include the Polikarpov Po-2, Sopwith Camel, Avro Tutor, Antonov An-2, Beechcraft Staggerwing, Boeing Stearman, Bristol Bulldog, Curtiss JN-4, de Havilland Tiger Moth, Fairey Swordfish, Hawker Hart, Pitts Special and the Wright Flyer. The Stearman is particularly associated with stunt flying with wing-walkers. Famous sesquiplanes include the Nieuport 17 and Albatros D.III.

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