Brazilwood

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Brazilwood
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Fabales
Family: Fabaceae
Subfamily: Caesalpinioideae
Genus: Caesalpinia
Binomial name
Caesalpinia echinata
Lam.
natural range

Brazilwood or Pau-Brasil, sometimes known as Pernambuco (Caesalpina echinata) is a Brazilian tree. It has a dense, orange-red wood (which takes a high shine), and it is the most frequently used wood for making bows for string instruments from the violin family. The wood also gives a red dye called brazilin.

There are actually several trees in this family which have very similar properties, including the development of red dye. So the term "brazilwood" is sometimes used for these other species as well. The tree was exploited for their dye in the 18th century, and is now lost over much of its original range.[1]

When Pedro Álvares Cabral found Brazil, he named it after the brazilwood that he found there.

References[change | change source]

  1. Varty, N. (1998). "Caesalpinia echinata". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2010.3. International Union for Conservation of Nature. [1]