Canons of Dort

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The Canons of Dort, also called the Canons of Dordrecht (full name: The Decision of the Synod of Dort on the Five Main Points of Doctrine in Dispute in the Netherlands) is the ruling of the National Synod (or meeting) that took place in the Dutch city of Dordrecht from 1618-1619. Dordrecht is often called Dort in English.

Today, the Canons of Dort are part of the Three Forms of Unity, which is one of the confession standards of many of the Reformed churches around the world. The Reformed churches continued use of the Canons as a standard keeps the Reformed churches from being in full harmony with the followers of Jacob Arminius, the Remonstrants and the Dutch Reformed Churches, who disagree with the Canons.

The Canons are not supposed to be an absolute explanation of the Reformed doctrine, but only explain the five points of doctrine that were being argued over. These Canons introduced the Five Points of Calvinism.

Books on the Canons[change | change source]

  • But for the Grace of God by Cornelis P. Venema
  • The Golden Chain of Salvation by John Bouwers
  • Unspeakable Comfort by Peter Feenstra
  • The Voice of our Fathers by Homer Hoeksema
  • The Reformed Doctrine of Predestination by Lorraine Boettner
  • The Synod of Dordt by Thomas Scott
  • The Canons of Dordt by Henry Peterson
  • The Five Points of Calvinism by David Steele and Curtis Thomas
  • The Works of John Owen, Vol. 10
  • TULIP by William Jay Hornbeck II

Other websites[change | change source]