Cantaloupe

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Cantaloupe
Ripe North American cantaloupes (C. m. reticulatus)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Cucurbitales
Family: Cucurbitaceae
Genus: Cucumis
Species: C. melo
Subspecies: C. m. cantalupensis
C. m. reticulatus
Trinomial name
Cucumis melo cantalupensis
Cucumis melo reticulatus

Naudin.

A cantaloupe also known as Rock Melon is a type of fruit. It is a muskmelon that is probably related to the watermelon. There are two types of cantaloupe, European and North American. Cantaloupes range in size from 0.5 to 5.0 kilograms (1.1 to 11 lb).

Types of cantaloupe[change | edit source]

Nutrition[change | edit source]

Cantaloupe melon
Nutritional value per 100 g (3.5 oz)
Energy 141 kJ (34 kcal)
Carbohydrates 8.16 g
- Sugars 7.86 g
- Dietary fiber 0.9 g
Fat 0.19 g
Protein 1.84 g
Water 90.15 g
Alcohol 0 mg
Caffeine 0 mg
Vitamin A equiv. 169 μg (19%)
- beta-carotene 2020 μg (19%)
Thiamine (Vit. B1) 0.041 mg (3%)
Riboflavin (Vit. B2) 0.019 mg (1%)
Niacin (Vit. B3) 0.734 mg (5%)
Pantothenic acid (B5) 0.105 mg (2%)
Vitamin B6 0.072 mg (6%)
Folate (Vit. B9) 21 μg (5%)
Vitamin B12 0.00 μg (0%)
Vitamin C 36.7 mg (61%)
Vitamin E 0.05 mg (0%)
Vitamin K 2.5 μg (2%)
Calcium 9 mg (1%)
Iron 0.21 mg (2%)
Magnesium 12 mg (3%)
Phosphorus 15 mg (2%)
Zinc 0.18 mg (2%)
Percentages are relative to US recommendations for adults.
Source: USDA Nutrient database

Cantaloupes are a source of polyphenol antioxidants. These are chemicals which were thought to provide certain health benefits to the cardiovascular and immune systems by regulating the formation of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide is a key chemical in promoting health of the endothelium and prevention of heart attacks. However, recent research has indicated they do not benefit the body. The body already has ways to deal with oxidation.

Cantaloupes also are an excellent source of vitamin C.

Dirty cantaloupes can spread bacteria. In 2011, 21 people died in the United States from cantaloupes having listeria bacteria. The bad cantaloupes were traced back from around the country to a single farm in Colorado.[1]

References[change | edit source]

  1. Associated Press (October 7, 2011). "21 deaths now linked to listeria in cantaloupe, new deaths reported in Indiana, New York". Washington Post. http://www.washingtonpost.com/business/21-deaths-now-linked-to-listeria-in-cantaloupe-new-deaths-reported-in-indiana-new-york/2011/10/07/gIQApgSTTL_story.html. Retrieved October 10, 2011.

Other websites[change | edit source]