Collaboration

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Collaboration is when people work with each other to complete a task.[1][2] It involves co-operation and teamwork and the sharing of ideas, knowledge and skills to reach the same objective.[3] The objective is usually creative in nature.[4] Most collaboration needs leadership or some kind of co-ordination, although responsibilities can be shared within an egalitarian group.[5]

Each person plays a tightly or loosely defined role in the process of collaboration. For instance, to make a movie a writer, director, producer and actors are needed. There may also be a need for a costumer, a cameraman (if the director cannot do it all), an audio engineer, and a film editor if the project is big enough and the schedule tight enough.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "collaboration". Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 11th Edition. Retrieved September 18, 2012 from CollinsDictionary.com. http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/english/collaboration.
  2. Marinez-Moyano, I. J. Exploring the Dynamics of Collaboration in Interorganizational Settings, Ch. 4, p. 83, in Schuman (Editor). Creating a Culture of Collaboration. Jossey-Bass, 2006. ISBN 0-7879-8116-8.
  3. Collaboration, Encyclopædia Britannica Online, 2007
  4. Collaboration, Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed., (1989). J. A. Simpson & E. S. C. Weiner (eds.) Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  5. Spence, Muneera U. "Graphic Design: Collaborative Processes = Understanding Self and Others." (lecture) Art 325: Collaborative Processes. Fairbanks Hall, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon. 13 April 2006.