Confederate States of America

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Sometimes called the CSA, for other uses see CSA
Third and final flag of the Confederate States of America.
The states in dark green were the Confederate States of America and light green shows their territories

The Confederate States of America (CSA) was a short-lived government that existed in the southern United States during the American Civil War. It was established in 1861 by seven southern states in which slavery was legal, after Abraham Lincoln was elected president of the U.S., but before he took office. South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas declared their secession (independence) from the United States. After war began, Virginia, Arkansas, Tennessee, and North Carolina joined them. The first capital of the Confederacy was Montgomery, Alabama, but for most of the war the capital was Richmond, Virginia.

The government of the Confederacy was much like the United States government. The CSA constitution was similar to that of the United States; however, it emphasized states rights and clearly protected slavery. Jefferson Davis was chosen as president, and Alexander Stephens as Vice-President. As in the United States, the CSA president had a cabinet of advisors.

The United States government (also known as the Union) did not agree that the states could leave and start a new government. Thus, the Union government refused to abandon all its forts in the states that wanted to secede. War began when the CSA attacked one of those forts, Fort Sumter in South Carolina. This war is known as the American Civil War, and it lasted from 1861 to 1865. After some of the deadliest battles in U.S. history, Union forces gradually regained control of southern states. As Confederate forces surrendered, the Confederacy fell apart and the Civil War came to a close in 1865. Following the war, slavery was outlawed everywhere in the United States. The process of restoring the states of the CSA to the United States continued until 1877.

Even today, many people argue about whether the Confederate States of America was ever a country. The Union never said that the Confederacy was really a country. Although British and French companies sold ships and materials to the Confederacy, no nation officially recognized the CSA as an independent country.[1][2]

The CSA was also called "the South", "the Confederacy", and "Dixie".

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