Decision-making

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Decision making is the mental process that leads to the selection of an action among several alternatives. Every decision making process produces a final choice.[1] The output can be an action or an opinion.

There is a growing awareness that people often make good decisions rapidly without knowing how they do it.[2][3] This runs against the older rational decision-making ideas.[4]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. James Reason (1990). Human Error. Ashgate. ISBN 1840141042 .
  2. Klein G. 1998. Sources of power: how people make decisions. MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-61146-6
  3. Gladwell, Malcolm 2005. Blink: the power of thinking without thinking. Little, Brown: New York. ISBN 0-316-05790-8
  4. Facione P. and Facione N. 2007. Thinking and reasoning in human decision making. [1]

Other websites[change | change source]

  • Emotional and Decision Making Lab, Carnegie Mellon, EDM Lab
  • The de Borda Institute - Emerson, P J. Beyond the Tyranny of the Majority, a comparison of the more common voting procedures used in both decision making and elections.
  • Decision Analysis in Health Care - An online course from George Mason University providing free lectures and tools for decision making in health care.
  • DecideBetter! - An online resource to help make better decisions in your everyday lives.