Division of Parkes

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Parkes
Australian House of Representatives Division
Division of Parkes 2010.png
Division of Parkes (green) within New South Wales
Created: 1984
MP: Mark Coulton
Party: National
Namesake: Sir Henry Parkes
Electors: 101903
Area: 256,643 km² (99,090 sq mi)
Demographic: Rural
Henry Parkes

The Division of Parkes is an Australian electoral division in the state of New South Wales. It is the largest electorate in the state. It is located in the far north of the state, next to the border with Queensland. It is named after Sir Henry Parkes, seventh Premier of New South Wales and sometimes known as the 'Father of Federation'.[1] It was set up in 1984.

It includes the towns of Dubbo. It also includes the towns of Mudgee, Dunedoo, Gunnedah, Coonabarabran, Coonamble, Walgett, Narrabri, Moree, Warren, Nyngan, Cobar and Bourke.[1] The division does not include the town of Parkes.

This is the second Division of Parkes. The first Division of Parkes (1901-69) was in suburban Sydney.

Members[change | change source]

Member Party Term
  Michael Cobb National 1984–1998
  Tony Lawler National 1998–2001
  John Cobb National 2001–2007
  Mark Coulton National 2007–present

Michael Cobb was found guilty of fraud in 1998.[2] He claimed money for staying in hotels, but he was actually seeping in his car. John Cobb was Minister for Citizenship and Multicultural Affairs and later Community Services in the Howard government. In the 2007 election Cobb moved to the Division of Calare.

Since the 2013 election, Parkes is the safest seat in Australia. It would need more votes than any other seat to change to another political party.

Election results[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "Profile of the electoral division of Parkes (NSW)". Australian Electoral Commission. 2014. http://www.aec.gov.au/profiles/nsw/parkes.htm. Retrieved 2 January 2014.
  2. Keogh, Kylie (13 October 2002). "Cobb and co in fight over will - smh.com.au". smh.com.au. http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2002/10/12/1034222635984.html. Retrieved 2 January 2014.

Other websites[change | change source]

Coordinates: 30°53′13″S 147°22′23″E / 30.887°S 147.373°E / -30.887; 147.373