Ed Balls

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The Right Honourable
Ed Balls

MP
Shadow Chancellor of the Exchequer
Incumbent
Assumed office
20 January 2011
Leader Ed Miliband
Preceded by Alan Johnson
Shadow Home Secretary
In office
8 October 2010 – 20 January 2011
Leader Ed Miliband
Preceded by Alan Johnson
Succeeded by Yvette Cooper
Shadow Secretary of State for Education
In office
11 May 2010 – 8 October 2010
Leader Harriet Harman
Ed Miliband
Preceded by Michael Gove (CSF)
Succeeded by Andy Burnham
Secretary of State for Children,
Schools and Families
In office
28 June 2007 – 11 May 2010
Prime Minister Gordon Brown
Preceded by Alan Johnson (EaS)
Succeeded by Michael Gove (E)
Economic Secretary to the Treasury
In office
6 May 2006 – 28 June 2007
Prime Minister Tony Blair
Preceded by Ivan Lewis
Succeeded by Kitty Ussher
Member of Parliament
for Morley and Outwood
Incumbent
Assumed office
6 May 2010
Preceded by Constituency Created
Majority 1,101 (2.3%)
Member of Parliament
for Normanton
In office
5 May 2005 – 6 May 2010
Preceded by Bill O'Brien
Succeeded by Constituency Abolished
Majority 10,002 (51.2%)
Personal details
Born 25 February 1967 (1967-02-25) (age 47)
Norwich, Norfolk, England
Political party Labour Co-operative
Spouse(s) Yvette Cooper
Children Ellie
Joe
Maddy
Alma mater Keble College, Oxford
Harvard University
Profession Politician
Religion Church of England[1]
Website Official website
Ed Balls

Edward Michael 'Ed' Balls (born 25 February 1967) is a British politician. He was the shadow Home Secretary in Ed Miliband's shadow cabinet. He was born in Norwich, Norfolk and moved to Nottinghamshire during his childhood. He is the Labour Party[2] and Co-operative Party Member of Parliament (MP) for the constituency of Morley and Outwood in the House of Commons of the United Kingdom.

He was first elected in the 2005 general election and held the post of Secretary of State for Children, Schools and Families from June 2007 to May 2010. He was a candidate to become leader of the Labour Party in September 2010 and lost to Ed Miliband.

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