Emerald

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Emerald
Emerald crystal muzo colombia.jpg
Emerald crystal from Muzo, Colombia
General
Category Beryl variety
Chemical formula Be3Al2(SiO3)6
Identification
Molecular Weight 537.50
Color Green shades
Crystal habit Massive to well Crystalline
Crystal system Hexagonal (6/m 2/m 2/m) Space group: P6/mсc
Cleavage Imperfect on the [0001]
Fracture Conchoidal
Mohs Scale hardness 7.5–8
Luster Vitreous
Refractive index nω = 1.564–1.595,
nε = 1.568–1.602
Optical Properties Uniaxial (-)
Birefringence δ = 0.0040–0.0070
Ultraviolet fluorescence None (some fracture filling materials used to improve emerald's clarity do fluoresce, but the stone itself does not)
Streak White
Specific gravity Average 2.76
Diaphaneity Transparent to opaque
References [1]

An emerald is a mineral rock and a variety of beryl. It is the birthstone of someone whose birthday is in the month of May. It is a green rock. The emerald is one of the most valuable gems, with ruby, opal, diamond, topaz, and sapphire, and it is more valuable than diamonds.[source?]

Emerald of Panjsher[change | change source]

Emerald is one of the most expensive stones in the world. The Panjsher Emerald, which is in Afghanistan, is the most famous stone in the world.[source?]

Etymology[change | change source]

The word emerald comes from Vulgar Latin. The word was Esmaralda/Esmaraldus, a different way of saying the Latin word Smaragdus, which came from the Greek, σμάραγδος (smaragdos; "green gem").[2][3] It first came from a Semitic word, izmargad (אזמרגד). This meant "emerald" or "green".[2] The name could also be related to the Semitic word baraq (בָּרָק ;البُراق‎; "lightning" or "shine") (c.f. Hebrew: ברקת bareqeth and Arabic: برق, barq, "lightning"). It is where the Persian (زمرّد zomorrod), Turkish (zümrüt), Sanskrit (मरग्दम् maragdam) and Russian (изумруд; izumrúd) words came from.[3]

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Emerald at Mindat". Mindat.org. 2010-07-19. http://www.mindat.org/min-1375.html. Retrieved 2010-07-30.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Fernie M.D., W.T. (1906). Precious Stones for Curative Wear. John Wright. & Co..
  3. 3.0 3.1 "Online Etymology Dictionary". etymonline.com. http://www.etymonline.com/index.php?search=emerald&searchmode=none. Retrieved 15 April 2010.