Europe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Map of Europe
The languages of Europe
Europe regional division
Europe history; 1000.

Europe is a continent, the western part of Eurasia. It is not part of Asia, because of a traditional eastern boundary that includes the Ural Mountains in Russia and the Bosporus in Turkey, and from Africa by the Mediterranean Sea to Balkans. The Atlantic Ocean is to the west of Europe. There are over 50 countries in Europe. Andreas M. Kaplan describes Europe as "embracing maximum cultural diversity at minimal geographical distances".[1] The European Union is made up of most of the countries in Europe. The city with the most people in Europe is Istanbul.

Origin of Name[change | change source]

Europe is named after a person in Greek mythology called Europa. She was said to have been abducted to Crete by Zeus. The name was later used for Greece. Then as the rest of the area we call Europe started to have cities and empires, the whole area West of the Ural Mountains became known by the same name.

Regions[change | change source]

Climate[change | change source]

In Europe there are different climates in different places; for example, in the north like Finland it stays snowy in the winter for 5–6 months and is about -30 degrees Celsius. However, during winter in Spain it is warmer and hardly snows, except on high mountains.

European Union[change | change source]

At this time, much of the continent shares some rulership in a body that is above any country, called the European Union.

History[change | change source]

The history of Europe is long and has many turns. Individual specific 'eras' - this is the term meaning long amounts of specific time - can be mentioned:

  • Pre-historic (Paleolithic, Mesolithic Neolithic) - 2,600,000 years ago to 5000
  • Ancient Greek Civilisation (Minoan, Classical, Hellenistic) - 3000-100 BC
  • Roman Civilisation
  • Medieval Civilisation (early, high, late) 400 AD-1500 AD
  • Early Modern Era (Renaissance, Reformation, Age of Discovery, French Revolution and Napeoleonic Wars) 1500-1800
  • Industrialisation 1800-1914
  • World War I - 1914-1918
  • Interwar Period - 1918-1939
  • World War II - 1939-1945
  • Cold War - 1945-1989
  • Contemporary era - 1989-2008[source?]
  • Post-Contemporary era - 2009-2011

List of Countries[change | change source]

References[change | change source]