First Vienna F.C. 1894

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First Vienna
Full name Fernwärme First Vienna Football Club 1894
Founded 22 August 1894
Ground Hohe Warte Stadium
(capacity: 5,000)
Manager Kurt Garger
League Austria First League
2012/13 7 th

First Vienna F.C. 1894 is a football club that plays in Austria. The club, which was founded in 1894, is the oldest one in Austria and played an important part in Austria's football history.[1] To an Austrian, the club is usually just called Vienna.

History[change | change source]

The club started with English and Austrian gardeners of Nathaniel Anselm von Rothschild who were playing on his grounds. To avoid damages, Rothschild gave them a ground and yellow-blue skirts. The yellow and blue colour is still used today.The team played its first match on 15 November 1894 against the Vienna Cricket and Football club, and lost 4-0. The great years of Vienna were the 1920´s and 1930´s. From 1938 to 1945, when Austria was occupied by Nazi Germany, Vienna was part of the Gauliga Ostmark and won the German Cup in 1943. In the 1940´s and 1950´s, Vienna was mainly in the middle area of the table.[2] In the 1980´s, the club played in the first league sometimes, and sometimes in the second. In 1992 they were sent down. Now, they play in the second division. They are struggling to avoid relegation into the third league.

Stadium[change | change source]

Hohe Warte (2005)

The home-ground of the Vienna is the Hohe Warte Stadium. Built in 1924, it is one of the oldest still in use. In the 1920´s and 1930´s it was where matches of the Austrian national team were played. 85,000 people visited the match against Italy in 1923. The ground is in Viennas Döbling district and is constructed on the side of a hill, which makes a natural amphitheatre.

Honours[change | change source]

  • Austrian champions (3): 1931, 1933,1955
  • Gauliga Ostmark(3):1942, 1943, 1944
  • Austrian Cup winner (3): 1929, 1930, 1937
  • Challenge Cup winner (2): 1899, 1900
  • German Cup winner: 1943
  • Mitropa Cup winner: 1931
  • Liberation Cup winner: 1946

[3]


References[change | change source]