Hebrew numerals

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The system of Hebrew numerals is a quasi-decimal alphabetic numeral system using the letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

In this system, zero does not have a place, and the number values for each letter are added together. Each unit (1, 2, ..., 9) is assigned a separate letter, each tens (10, 20, ..., 90) a separate letter, and each hundreds (100, 200, ..., 900) a separate letter.

Main table[change | edit source]

Hebrew has masculine and feminine ways of saying the words. For just counting, feminine is used. Otherwise, the gender is used (ex. two boys, two girls).

Decimal Hebrew Glyph Name
Masculine Feminine
0 N/A efes
1 Aleph א echad achat
2 Bet ב shnayim shtayim
3 Gimel ג shlosha shalosh
4 Dalet ד arba'a arbah
5 Hei ה chamisha chamesh
6 Vav ו shisha shesh
7 Zayin ז shiv'a sheva
8 Het ח shmonah shmoneh
9 Tet ט tish'a tayshah
10 Yud י assara eser
20 Kaf כ esrim
30 Lamed ל shloshim
40 Mem מ arba'im
50 Nun (letter) נ chamishim
60 Samekh ס shishim
70 Ayin ע shiv'im
80 Pei פ shmonim
90 Tsadi צ tish'im
100 Kuf ק me'a
200 Resh ר matayim
300 Shin ש shlosh meot
400 Tav ת arba meot
500 Tav Kuf or Chaf Sofit ת"ק or ך chamesh meot
600 Tav Resh or Mem Sofit ת"ר or ם shesh meot
700 Tav Shin or Nun Sofit ת"ש or ן shva meot
800 Tav Tav or Pei Sofit ת"ת or ף shmone meot
900 Tav Tav Kuf or Tsadi Sofit תת"ק or ץ tsha meot
  • The number is first, then the noun (ex. shlosha yeladim), except for number one where it is reversed (ex. yelad echad).
  • The number two is special. Shnayim (m.) and shtayim (f.) become shney (m.), and shtey (f.) when describing the number of some noun.
  • Mixed groups are always addressed as male, which is the case with all Hebrew.
  • Objects are either male or female (ex. a book (sefer) is male).