Hecate

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Hecate

Hecate is the Greek goddess of magic and crossroads. She is sometimes seen as having three-heads. Zeus favors her greatly. She is also the mother of Circe and other famous sorceresses. Hecate often carries a torch, and because of this she is often described as having black hair, luminous skin, and starry eyes. She is very similar to Artemis and Selene as Hecate is sometimes represented by the moon, and is a virgin goddess. In modern day she is represented by witchcraft, as the old lady stirring potions in a cauldron. Her parents are Perses and Asteria. Hecate's main attributes are torches, dogs, keys, and the number three. She is the goddess of magic, witchcraft, the night, moon, ghosts and necromancy. She was the only child of the Titanes Perses and Asteria from whom she received her power over heaven, earth, and sea. She has an army of monsters with one gout leg one bronze leg a ghost's body, many fangs and flaming hair.The first of these came from pandora's pythos (they did not have boxes then).

To say her name correctly, you must know that in the Greek language, the “H” is silent. Her name, properly pronounced, is “E-CA-TA” or “e-CO-ta.”

Hecate was originally worshipped in Thrace (a place in ancient Greece) as a moon goddess. Eventually, she became known with Selene (the moon goddess) and Persephone (goddess of springtime, daughter of Demeter, the goddess of harvest). Hecate’s parents were the titans, Perses, titan of destruction, and Astraea, the titan of the starry night. She was a sort of triple goddess, looked at as having three bodies of pretty, young maidens that were joined together. But in later times, she was thought as an old crone or witch. As a Roman goddess, her name was Trivia.

This goddess usually had something to do with having children, taking care of children, walls and gates, crossroads, magic, torches, dogs, and lunar lore. She was said to have three dogs by her side, and carried a torch. She was also said to usually be seen at night.

Hecate was also greatly recognized as a wicked, gory goddess. But it is important to remember her gentle, generous, powerful side as well.

References[change | change source]

The Goddess Hecate. Hecate's Cauldron, n.d. Web. 23 Oct. 2012. <http://www.hecatescauldron.org>.

Hecate. Albany, n.d. Web. 13 Nov. 2012. <http://www.albany.edu/faculty/lr618/51to.htm>.

"Hecate." Greek Gods-Hecate. Alex Goldberger, n.d. Web. 6 Nov. 2012. <http://people.rit.edu/asg1478/iweb/turbo/hecate.html>.

"Hecate." Hecate. Princeton University, n.d. Web. 6 Nov. 2012. <http://www.princeton.edu>.

Perses. Theoi, n.d. Web. 27 Nov. 2012. <http://www.theoi.com/Titan/TitanPerses.html>.