Holocaust denial

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Holocaust denial is the claim that The Holocaust did not happen, or was not a very big event. History experts agree that the Nazis did kill many people in concentration camps and there is more proof in writing, pictures and places about the Holocaust than any other great killing of people. Many Holocaust deniers want other people to believe what they say, so they call themselves Holocaust revisionists. They use these words to make their beliefs sound true to people who do not know this history.[1] and say that the Holocaust was the product of a conspiracy.[2][3]

It is against the law to deny the Holocaust in a number of European countries, especially in Germany.[4] Ernst Zündel is a well known Holocaust-denier, he faces prosecution in Germany for it.

References[change | edit source]

  1. Lipstadt, Deborah, Denying the Holocaust: The Growing Assault on Truth and Memory, Penguin, 1993, ISBN 0-452-27274-2, p. 25
  2. Mathis, Andrew E. Holocaust Denial, a Definition, The Holocaust History Project, July 2, 2004, Retrieved 6 March 2013
  3. Michael Shermer & Alex Grobman. Denying History: : who Says the Holocaust Never Happened and why Do They Say It?, University of California Press, 2000, ISBN 0-520-23469-3, p. 106
  4. Bazyler, Michael J. (December 25, 2006). "Holocaust Denial Laws and Other Legislation Criminalizing Promotion of Nazism". Yad Vashem. http://www1.yadvashem.org/yv/en/holocaust/insights/pdf/bazyler.pdf. Retrieved 30 March 2012.

Other websites[change | edit source]