Huckleberry

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Wild Huckleberries

Huckleberry is a name used in North America for several plants in two closely related genera in the family Ericaceae: Gaylussacia and Vaccinium. The Huckleberry is the state fruit of Idaho.

Some Vaccinium species, such as the Red Huckleberry, are always called huckleberries. Other species may be called blueberries or huckleberries in different locations.

There is much confusion in naming of berries in American English. The 'garden huckleberry' (Solanum melanocerasum) is not a true huckleberry but a member of the nightshade family.

The fruit of most species of huckleberry can be eaten. The berries are small and round. They are usually less than 5 mm in diameter and contain 10 seeds. Berries range in color from bright red, through dark purple, and into the blues. In taste the berries range from tart to sweet. They have a flavor similar to that of a blueberry. Huckleberries are well liked by many mammals such as bears and humans.