James Murdoch (journalist)

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James Murdoch (27 September 1856 – 30 October 1921) was a Scottish-Australian academic, journalist, translator, editor and Japanologist. He is best known for writing a three-volume A History of Japan. It was the first history of Japan published in the English.[1]

Early life[change | edit source]

Murdoch was born in Stonehaven, near Aberdeen, in Scotland. At the University of Aberdeen, he earned a bachelor's and master's degree. He also studied at Oxford University.[1]

Selected works[change | edit source]

In an overview of writings by and about Murdoch, OCLC/WorldCat lists roughly 60+ works in 130+ publications in 4 languages and 1,300+ library holdings .[2]

This list is not finished; you can help Wikipedia by adding to it.
  • A history of constitutional reform in Great Britain and Ireland : with full account of the three great measures of 1832, 1867 and 1884, 1885
  • The narrative of a Japanese; what he has seen and the people he has met in the course of the last forty years, 1890 (with Joseph Heco)
  • Ayame-san, a Japanese romance of the 23rd year of Meiji (1890), 1892
  • From Australia and Japan, 1892
  • The Nikkō district, 1893
  • Scenes from the Chiushingura and the story of the forty-seven Rōnin, 1893
  • A history of Japan, 1903
  • Scenes from open air life in Japan, 1910 (with W. K Burton)

References[change | edit source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Sissons, D. C. S. "Murdoch, James (1856–1921)," Australian Dictionary of Biography; 2012-11-6.
  2. WorldCat Identities: Murdoch, James 1856-1921; retrieved 2012-11-1.

Other websites[change | edit source]