John Harbaugh

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John Harbaugh
JohnHarbaugh2009.jpg
Harbaugh at the Baltimore Ravens Training Camp August 20, 2009
Current position
Title Head coach
Team Baltimore Ravens
Personal information
Date of birth September 23, 1962 (1962-09-23) (age 51)
Place of birth Toledo, Ohio
Career information
Position(s) Head coach
Defensive back
College Miami (OH)
Career highlights
Awards Super Bowl Champion
XLVII (as a head coach)
Head coaching record
Regular season 62–33 (Template:Winning percentage)
Postseason 9–4 (Template:Winning percentage)
Career record 71–37 (Template:Winning percentage)
Super Bowl wins XLVII
Championships won AFC NFC 2004
Team(s) as a coach/administrator
1984–1987


1987

1988


1989–1996

1997


1998–2007


2008–present
Western Michigan University
(Running backs coach)
(Outside linebackers coach)
University of Pittsburgh
(Tight ends coach)
Morehead State University
(Special teams coach)
(Secondary coach)
University of Cincinnati
(Special teams coordinator)
Indiana University
(Special teams coordinator)
(Defensive backs coach)
Philadelphia Eagles
(Special teams coordinator)
(Defensive backs coach)
Baltimore Ravens
(Head coach)

John Harbaugh (born 9/23/1962 in Toledo, Ohio, USA) is the head coach for the Baltimore Ravens of the National Football League. Since taking over the position from Brian Billick in 2008, Harbaugh has gotten the Ravens to the playoffs in each season, and is the only NFL head coach to do so. Harbaugh was previously the special teams coordinator and secondary coach of the Philadelphia Eagles for nine seasons. He is part of the famous Harbaugh coaching tree, that includes Father Jack Harbaugh and younger brother Jim Harbaugh.

Reputation[change | change source]

Harbaugh has been respected as a great coach. As previously mentioned, Harbaugh is the only head coach in NFL history to take his team to the playoffs in each of his first four seasons. Harbaugh has also been successful on most challenge attempts.

However, Harbaugh has sometimes been criticized for keeping unpopular offensive coordinator Cam Cameron, among some other things. But in 2013 he led the Baltimore Ravens to the Super Bowl.

References[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]