Joseph Epstein

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Joseph Epstein (born January 9, 1937 in Chicago) is an American academic, writer and editor. He is best known as an editor of The American Scholar from 1975 to 1997. He was given the National Humanities Medal in 2003.[1]

Selected works[change | change source]

In an summary based on writings by and about Joseph Epstein, OCLC/WorldCat includes roughly 60+ works in 135 publications in 6 languages and 21,000+ library holdings.[2]

  • Divorced in America: Marriage in an Age of Possibility (1974)
  • Familiar Territory: Observations on American Life (1979)
  • Ambition: The Secret Passion (1980)
  • Middle of My Tether: Familiar Essays (1983)
  • Plausible Prejudices: Essays on American Writing (1985)
  • Once More Around the Block: Familiar Essays (1987)
  • Partial Payments: Essays on Writers and Their Lives (1988)
  • A Line Out for a Walk: Familiar Essays (1991)
  • Pertinent Players: Essays on the Literary Life (1993)
  • With My Trousers Rolled: Familiar Essays (1995)
  • Life Sentences: Literary Essays (1997)
  • Narcissus Leaves the Pool: Familiar Essays (1999, paperback 2007)
  • Snobbery: The American Version (2002)
  • Envy (2003)
  • Friendship: An Exposé (2006)
  • Alexis de Tocqueville: Democracy's Guide (2006)
  • In a Cardboard Belt!: Essays Personal, Literary, and Savage (2007)
  • Fred Astaire (2008)
  • Gossip: The Untrivial Pursuit (2011)

Honors[change | change source]

  • National Humanities Medal, 2003[1]

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 "2003 National Humanities Medal Winners," Humanities, January/February 2004, Volume 25/Number 1; retrieved 2012-5-23.
  2. WorldCat Identities: Epstein, Joseph 1937- ; retrieved 2012-5-23.