Latent autoimmune diabetes

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults (LADA) is very similar to both Type 1 diabetes and Type 2 diabetes: although the disease is autoimmune, insulin resistance accompanies the disease as it does Type 2 diabetes.[1]

Most latent autoimmune diabetic people are thin, although there are many people that are overweight to slightly obese who have the LADA.[2][1] The differences between LADA and true type 2 diabetes is, unlike many with the latter, those with LADA become insulin dependent within 3-12 years based on different sources.[3] Latent autoimmune diabetes of adults is very different from true type 1 diabetes in that the condition happens gradually instead of rapid; it's different from type 2 diabetes in that although the latter, like LADA, occurs gradually, with latent autoimmune diabetes of adults, there is also autoimmunity associated.

People with LADA are misdiagnosed as having Type 2 diabetes, except that LADA has GAD antibodies. Contrary to the popular belief, some people with latent autoimmune diabetes do have family histories of Type 2 diabetes involving their parents, sister, brother, uncles, aunts, cousins, etc.[4][5][6][7] Also, LADA does not affect children and teenagers[source?] and usually affects people age 35 and older, but can affect anyone between 23-30 years of age.

Prognosis and treatment[change | change source]

People with LADA usually control their diabetes using very similar methods and changes of lifestyle to Type 2 diabetes: eating right, exercising and oral medications; weight loss is optional. Unlike Type 2 diabetics who might never need to inject insulin, however, the LADA patients become insulin dependent within several years. By contrast only 20% to 30% of those with Type 2 diabetes eventually become insulin dependent (i.e., inject insulin).[8][9]

Genes and antibodies[change | change source]

There are glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) antibodies connected with the latent autoimmune diabetes. There are also TCF7L2 genes associated with Type 2 diabetes which are also connected with LADA.[10]

Complications[change | change source]

The complications of latent autoimmune diabetes of adults are highly similar to those for types 1 and 2 diabetes: stroke, heart disease, gangrene, kidney trouble, heart attacks, etc.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Jenny (12 May 2008). "The LADA Epidemic. What's Going on Here?". http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/2008/05/lada-epidemic-whats-going-on-here.html. Retrieved 1 December 2009.[unreliable source?]
  2. LADA/Insulin Resistance . Diabetes Health. Report. Retrieved on April 10, 2010.
  3. "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults". Endocrine Regulations. http://www.aepress.sk/endo/full/er0301e.pdf. Retrieved Jan 26, 2010.
  4. "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adults". American Diabetes Association. http://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/32/2/245.full. Retrieved Jan. 26, 2010.
  5. "What is LADA". http://ki.se/ki/jsp/polopoly.jsp?d=27869&a=73748&l=en. Retrieved 22 November 2009.
  6. Dunn, J. P.; Perkins, J. M.; Jagasia, S. M. (2008). "Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults and Pregnancy: Foretelling the Future". Clinical Diabetes 26: 44. doi:10.2337/diaclin.26.1.44.
  7. Family History and LADA . PubMed. Report. Retrieved on Jan 23, 2010.
  8. LADA: A Little Known Type of Diabetes . Pharmacy Times. Report. Retrieved on January 27, 2010.
  9. "LADA". Action LADA. http://www.actionlada.org. Retrieved April 22, 2010.
  10. "What is LADA". Blood Sugar 101. http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/18382053.php. Retrieved Sunday, November 22, 2009.