Laxative

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A laxative is a food or drug taken to make bowel movements easier, or to treat constipation.[1] Sometimes taking powerful or lots of laxatives can cause diarrhea or a flatulence.

Laxatives work by helping your intestines digest undigested food, and do not make you lose weight. Despite this, some people with eating disorders take laxatives in an attempt to lose weight.

References[change | change source]

  1. See for example:
    • Di Palma JA, Cleveland MV, McGowan J, Herrera JL (2007). "A randomized, multicenter comparison of polyethylene glycol laxative and tegaserod in treatment of patients with chronic constipation". Am. J. Gastroenterol. 102 (9): 1964–71. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01365.x
    . PMID 17573794 .
    • Attar A, Lémann M, Ferguson A, Halphen M, Boutron M, Flourié B, Alix E, Salmeron M, Guillemot F, Chaussade S, Ménard A, Moreau J, Naudin G, Barthet M (1999). "Comparison of a low dose polyethylene glycol electrolyte solution with lactulose for treatment of chronic constipation". Gut 44 (2): 226–30. doi:10.1136/gut.44.2.226
    . PMC 1727381 . PMID 9895382 .
    • Dipalma JA, Cleveland MV, McGowan J, Herrera JL (2007). "A randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial of polyethylene glycol laxative for chronic treatment of chronic constipation". Am. J. Gastroenterol. 102 (7): 1436–41. doi:10.1111/j.1572-0241.2007.01199.x
    . PMID 17403074 .