Left–right politics

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Political parties are often described as being either left-wing, right-wing, or center.

Left-wing parties are more socialist based, so they will tax more, but they offer more government services, such as cheaper or free education, health, etc. A good example of a left-wing country would be Norway. The maximum individual tax rate in Norway is 47.8% the minimum being 36%, but the government provides free education, health care, unemployment benefits, pension benefits, to name a few.

Right-wing parties are more corporately based, and allow businesses to have more freedom from government control. They also expect a higher level of self-provision by people. Right-wing parties also try to reduce the level of government control over society and community. Businesses can get tax breaks, loosened tax rules, and the government also loosens up labor laws, making it easier for businesses to hire and fire people.

The two extremes of each side are Communism on the extreme left, and Fascism on the extreme right. Left-wing politicians believe in equality, while right-wing politicians believe in the opposite.