Lens (anatomy)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Crystalline lens (anatomy)
Focus in an eye.svg
Light from a single point of a distant object and light from a single point of a near object being brought to a focus by changing the curvature of the lens.
Schematic diagram of the human eye en.svg
Schematic diagram of the human eye.
Latin lens crystallina
Gray's subject #226 1019
MeSH Crystalline+lens

The crystalline lens is a transparent, biconvex structure in the eye. With the cornea it helps to refract light to be focused on the retina. The lens changes shape. This changes the focal distance of the eye so that it can focus on objects at various distances. This adjustment of the lens is called accommodation. It is similar to the focusing of a photographic camera when it focuses its lenses. The lens is flatter on the inside.

The lens is also called the aquula (Latin, a little stream, dim. of aqua, water) or crystalline lens. In humans, the refractive power of the lens in its natural environment is approximately 18 dioptres. This is about one-third of the eye's total power.

Related pages[change | change source]