Liège

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Liège and the new train station

Liège (Walloon: Lîdje, Dutch: Luik, German: Lüttich) is a city in Belgium. It is the cultural centre of the Walloon region of Belgium and the capital of the province of Liège. Liège is also seat of a Roman Catholic bishop. In 2007, 188,907 people lived there.[1]

It is at 50° 38 North, 05° 34 East.[2]

The first written trace of the city was found in 558 as Leodicum or Vicus Leodicus. From 717, Liege was made the seat of a bishopric and became a cultural centre in the Middle Ages. These bishops ruled the city as Prince-Bishops until the 1790s. In the French Revolution, the cathedral was damaged, partially burned down and then completely detroyed. In the 19th century, the city lived on coal-mining, steel industry and trade. The region was the second biggest economic center in Europe after the UK in the 19th century.

Today Liege is a major educational hub, with a university and many high schools. It is a crossing point in Europe, Liège has the second biggest inner harbour and the 8th biggest cargo airport in Europe (Liège Airport). The city, that had a lot of problems since the 1970s because of the end of the steel industry and coal-mining, is now having a good economy thanks to the logistics and high tech industry (biotechnology, space industry, IT).

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