Liqueur

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Strawberry liqueur

A liqueur is a sweet-tasting alcoholic drink. It is often flavored with fruits, herbs, spices, flowers, seeds, roots, plants, barks, and sometimes cream. The word liqueur comes from the Latin word liquifacere which means "to dissolve." This is because the flavors are dissolved to help make the liqueur. In some parts of the world, liqueurs are sometimes called cordials.

Liqueurs have been around for many centuries. They are related to the herbal medicines that monks used to make. Liqueurs were made in Italy as early as the 13th century, and were used during signings of treaties during the Middle Ages.

Varieties[change | edit source]

Most liqueurs have 15 to 30% alcohol content but may have an alcohol content as high as 55%.

Types of liqueurs include: fruit liqueur, cream liqueur, coffee liqueur, chocolate liqueur, schnapps liqueur, brandy liqueur, anise liqueur, nut-flavoured liqueur, and herbal liqueur.

Liqueurs can be enjoyed many ways. They are commonly drank by themselves, poured over ice, with coffee, or mixed with cream or other mixers to create cocktails. They are often served with dessert or as a dessert. Liqueurs may also be used in cooking.

Reference[change | edit source]


Other websites[change | edit source]