Malleability

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Malleability is a physical property of matter, usually metals. This property usually applies to the family groups 1 to 12 on the modern periodic table of elements. It is the ability of a solid to bend or be hammered into other shapes without breaking. Examples of malleable metals are gold, iron, aluminum, copper (to a degree)[needs to be explained] and lead.

Malleability is the ability of a metal to be hammered into thin sheets. Gold and silver are highly malleable. When a piece of hot iron is hammered it takes the shape of a sheet. The property is not seen in non-metals. Non-malleable metals may break apart when struck by a hammer.

Malleable metals usually bend and twist in various shapes.