Meditation

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Meditation is to try to get past the "thinking" mind, and into a deeper state of relaxation or awareness.

Meditation is used in Buddhism, Christianity (sometimes), Hinduism (where Yoga is important) and other religions.

Buddhist meditation[change | edit source]

Buddhism

Dharma Wheel.svg

Basic terms

People

Gautama Buddha
Dalai Lama
Bodhisattva
Sangha

Schools

Theravada
Mahayana
Zen
Vajrayana
Nyingma Kagyu Sakya Gelug

Practices

study Dharma
Meditation
Metta

In Buddhism, three things are very important: being a good person, making the mind stronger, and understanding why people are in pain (Dukkha).[1]

Buddhist meditation is not just used for spiritual reasons. Research shows that Buddhist meditation lowers stress, anxiety and depression.[2]

For Buddhists, meditation is used to calm the mind so that the mind can better see the cause of pain. Buddhists believe that this type of seeing can end pain.[3]

Most types of Buddhist meditation focus on something. The most popular things to focus on include the breath, love, other emotions, and religious images and sounds.[4]

Christian meditation[change | edit source]

Christians sometimes meditate by thinking about small parts of the Bible, or by saying the words of a prayer to themselves over and over.

Related pages[change | edit source]

Hare Krishna

Notes[change | edit source]

  1. In Buddhism, these three things together are called the "threefold training." In the words of 2,000-year-old Buddhist books, these three things are called sīla, citta (or samādhi) and paññā. See, for example, Thanissaro (1998a) and Thanissaro (1998b).
  2. Kabat-Zinn (1990); and, Linehan (1993), p. 1.
  3. See, for instance, Thanissaro (1998c).
  4. See, for example, Kamalashila (2003).

References[change | edit source]

  • Kabat-Zinn, Jon (1990). Full Catastrophe Living: Using the Wisdom of Your Body and Mind to Face Stress, Pain, and Illness. NY: Dell Publishing. ISBN 0-385-30312-2.
  • Linehan, Marsha M. (1993). Skills Training Manual for Treating Borderline Personality Disorder. NY: Guilford Press. ISBN 0-89862-034-1.

Other websites[change | edit source]