Nonverbal learning disorder

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A nonverbal learning disorder (or nonverbal learning disability), or NVLD, is a neurological problem. It can cause lower verbal skills, lower motor, social skills and other areas.[1] A person with NVLD also has problems in non-verbal problem solving, understanding humor and rote learning (remembering something by repeating it).

NVLD is linked with autism spectrum disorders, mostly autism or Asperger's. Most people with either high-functioning autism or Asperger fit this actual type.[2] This condition, though, is also tied to depression and anxiety.

Nonverbal learning disabilities affect one in ten learning disabled children.[3]

References[change | change source]

  1. "Diagnosis & Differential Diagnosis". Advances. http://apt.rcpsych.org/content/7/4/310.full. Retrieved Jan 14, 2014.
  2. "Nonverbal Learning Disability". The National Center for Learning Disability. http://www.ncld.org/types-learning-disabilities/adhd-related-issues/autism-spectrum-disorders/nonverbal-learning-disabilities. Retrieved Jan 14, 2014.
  3. Liza Little, PsyD, RN. [http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/~rowley/sb-kids/publications/Misunderstood%20Child%20-NLD.pdf "The Misunderstood Child: The Child With a Nonverbal Learning Disorder"]. http://www.waisman.wisc.edu/~rowley/sb-kids/publications/Misunderstood%20Child%20-NLD.pdf.