Palace of Westminster

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Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey and St Margaret's Church *
The Palace of Westminster at dusk, showing the Victoria Tower (left) and the Clock Tower—colloquially known as "Big Ben"—lies on the bank of the River Thames in the heart of London
Country United Kingdom United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
Type Cultural
Criteria i, ii, iv
Reference 426
Region ** Europe and North America
Inscription history
Inscription 1987 (11th Session)
Westminster Hall and its hammerbeam roof, in the early 19th century. The Hall is the only original piece of Gothic architecture in the Westminster Palace. The rest is Gothic revival.

The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom meet.

In 1605, Guy Fawkes attempted to blow the Palace up. He was caught and later executed. This was called the Gunpowder Plot, and is celebrated on 5 November every year.

The original building was used as a palace and home to the Parliament of England. After a fire in 1834, the building was used as a Parliament building.

Westminster Palace, Westminster Abbey and Saint Margaret's Church make up a UNESCO World Heritage Site.[1] Westminster Palace is an example of Gothic Revival architecture.[1]

References[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Palace of Westminster at Wikimedia Commons

This article is about a World Heritage Site

Coordinates: 51°29′59″N 0°07′43″E / 51.49972°N 0.12861°E / 51.49972; 0.12861