Pika

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Pika[1]
American Pika, (Ochotona princeps), in Sequoia National Park
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Lagomorpha
Family: Ochotonidae
Thomas, 1897
Genus: Ochotona
Link, 1795
Type species
Ochotona minor
Link, 1795
(= Lepus dauuricus Pallas, 1776)

Pikas are small mammals that resemble chinchillas. Chinchillas are rodents, but pikas are related to the hare and the rabbit, they are lagomorphs. Pikas are also known as rock rabbits or coneys. There are 30 different species of pika.

Most Pikas live in colder climates, on rocky mountain slopes, in Asia, North America and parts of Eastern Europe. They are active during the day or the twilight, that is at nightfall, and in early morning. Pikas do not hibernate. They collect hay, which they pile up to dry. They sometimes steal hay from each other. This often results in disputes. Predators, like ferrets, and large birds often use such disputes to catch pikas.

Pikas in Eurasia lead their lives in family groups, they also share their duties. The pikas in North America don't, they are asocial outside the breeding season.

References[change | change source]

  1. Hoffmann, Robert S.; Andrew T. Smith (2005-11-16). Wilson, D. E., and Reeder, D. M. (eds). ed. Mammal Species of the World (3rd edition ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 185-193. ISBN 0-801-88221-4 . http://www.bucknell.edu/msw3.