Plural

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The quantitatory descriptor plural is the form of a noun that serves to indicate that the quantity of that noun is larger than one.

The quantitatory descriptor singular is the form of a noun that serves to indicate that the quantity of that noun is one, that the noun is a unit.

In some languages, a suffix (word ending) is added to a word to show that the word means two or more than two. In the English language, the suffix_ -s is used to indicate that a noun has been inflexed into its plural form. Here is an example_ cat is a singular noun, but cats is a plural noun.

All European languages have plural forms. In such languages as Arabic, ancient Hebrew and Inuktitut, there are dual plural forms. In other languages, there are such quantitatory descriptors as

  • nullar (zero object)
  • trial (three objects)
  • paucal (a few objects)

The suffix that is used in each one of these other descriptors of quantity is different from the suffix that is applied to English nouns to make them plural.

In such East Asian languages as Chinese, Korean and Japanese, there is zero plural ending. Aboriginal speakers of these languages usually fail to inflex English nouns into their plural forms.