Political machine

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A political machine (sometimes called just machine in politics) is a political organization in which a person or small group with authority that has enough votes or is popular enough to have control over political administration or any type of government in a city, county, or state.[1] The term political machine has been used mostly since the 18th century in the United States, used to describe machines like Tamanny Hall who stayed in control mostly because of the large support from the immigrants in Manhattan during the 18th century.

References[change | edit source]

  1. "Political machine -- Britannica Online Encyclopaedia". http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/467617/political-machine. Retrieved 15 January 2011. "political machine, in U.S. politics, a party organization, headed by a single boss or small autocratic group, that commands enough votes to maintain political and administrative control of a city, county, or state."