Progressive Judaism

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Progressive Judaism, sometimes called Reform Judaism is a movement within Judaism. This movement has its roots in a movement in 19th century Germany. There are a number of movements which fall under these denominations. In very basic terms:

  • Jewish laws can be split into ethical and ritual laws. The ethical laws do not change, the ritual laws can be adapted to customs.
  • To some extent, Jews should integrate into the society they live in. This means that some of the ritual laws must be adapted. Such adaptations also allow modern lifestyles.
  • The texts that are the basis of Judaism should not be read literally. They can be analyzed and criticized like any other text.
  • Women are seen as equals to men and are allowed to sit with the men when attending synagogue while in Orthodox Judaism, women are expected to sit in a different area. Women are also allowed to not wear head coverings when attending synagogue.
  • Less Hebrew is spoken in Reform synagogues.

Related pages[change | edit source]