Propane

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Propane
Propane-2D-Skeletal.svg
PropaneFull.png
Propane-3D-balls-B.png
Propane-3D-vdW-B.png
IUPAC name Propane[1]
Identifiers
CAS number 74-98-6
PubChem 6334
EC number 200-827-9
KEGG D05625
ChEBI CHEBI:32879
RTECS number TX2275000
SMILES CCC
Beilstein Reference 1730718
Gmelin Reference 25044
Properties
Molecular formula C3H8
Molar mass 44.1 g mol-1
Appearance Colorless gas
Odor Odorless
Density 2.0098 mg mL−1 (at 0 °C, 101.3 kPa)
Melting point

-188 °C, 85.5 K, -306 °F

Boiling point

-42--42 °C, 230.9-231.11 K, -44--44 °F

Solubility in water 40 mg L−1 (at 0 °C)
log P 2.236
Vapor pressure 853.16 kPa (at 21.1 °C)
kH 15 nmol Pa−1 kg−1
Thermochemistry
Std enthalpy of
formation
ΔfHo298
−105.2–−104.2 kJ mol−1
Std enthalpy of
combustion
ΔcHo298
−2.2197–−2.2187 MJ mol−1
Specific heat capacity, C 73.60 J K−1 mol−1
Hazards
EU classification Flammable F+
EU Index 601-003-00-5
NFPA 704

NFPA 704.svg

4
1
0
 
R-phrases Template:R12
S-phrases Template:S2, Template:S16
Flash point −104 °C
Autoignition
temperature
540 °C
Explosive limits 2.37–9.5%
Related compounds
Related alkanes
Related compounds Diiodohydroxypropane
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C, 100 kPa)

Propane is an alkane (a hydrocarbon). An alkane is a molecule composed of the chemical elements hydrogen and carbon. Propane has three carbon atoms and eight hydrogen atoms, so its molecular formula is C3H8.

It begins to burn very quickly. Its melting temperature is −187.7 °C; its boiling temperature is −42 °C; its density is 1.83 g/l.

Propane is extracted from natural gasoline or from petroleum.

Sources[change | change source]

  1. "Propane – Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 27 March 2005. Identification and Related Records. http://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/summary/summary.cgi?cid=6334&loc=ec_rcs. Retrieved 8 December 2011.