Rabbit

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Rabbit
Eastern Cottontail (Sylvilagus floridanus)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Lagomorpha
Family: Leporidae
in part
Genera

Pentalagus
Bunolagus
Nesolagus
Romerolagus
Brachylagus
Sylvilagus
Oryctolagus
Poelagus

Rabbits are mammals of the order Lagomorpha. There are about fifty different species of rabbits and hares. The order Lagomorpha is made of rabbits, pikas and hares. Rabbits can be found in many parts of the world.[1] They live in families and eat vegetables and hay. In the wild, rabbits live in burrows, that they dig themselves. A group of rabbits living together in a burrow is called a warren.

A male rabbit is called a buck, and a female is called a doe. A baby rabbit is called a kit, which is short for kitten. Rabbits have a gestation period of around 31 days. The female can have up to 12-13, very rarely litters as big as 18 and as small as one.

A young rabbit looking through the grass.

Some people have rabbits as pets. Rabbits are also raised for their meat. Rabbits are of a different biological classification than hares.

Since rabbits are prey animals, they tend to be exploratory in new spaces and when confronted with a threat, they freeze and observe. Rabbit vision has a very wide field, and a good deal of it is devoted to overhead scanning. Even indoors, rabbits will scan for overhead threats.

Rabbits have a complex social structure, and like dogs, will try to get a hierarchy and dominance. Rabbits, when they are happy their ears are up. When they don't feel good, their ears are down.

Predators of the rabbit include bears, domesticated cats and dogs, foxes, raccoons, snakes and even some humans. People are also known to go shooting rabbits.

The expected lifespan of a rabbit is about 9 to 12 years. The oldest rabbit on record was 18 years old.

References[change | edit source]