Robert Byrd

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Robert Byrd
Official Senate picture, 2007
President pro tempore of the United States Senate
In office
January 3, 2007 – June 28, 2010
Leader Harry Reid
Preceded by Ted Stevens
Succeeded by Daniel Inouye
In office
June 6, 2001 – January 3, 2003
Leader Tom Daschle
Preceded by Strom Thurmond
Succeeded by Ted Stevens
In office
January 3, 2001 – January 20, 2001
Leader Tom Daschle
Preceded by Strom Thurmond
Succeeded by Strom Thurmond
In office
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1995
Leader George Mitchell
Preceded by John Stennis
Succeeded by Strom Thurmond
President pro tempore Emeritus of the United States Senate
In office
January 3, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Leader Bill Frist
Preceded by Strom Thurmond
Succeeded by Ted Stevens
Senate Majority Leader
In office
January 3, 1987 – January 3, 1989
Deputy Alan Cranston
Preceded by Bob Dole
Succeeded by George Mitchell
In office
January 3, 1977 – January 3, 1981
Deputy Alan Cranston
Preceded by Mike Mansfield
Succeeded by Howard Baker
Senate Minority Leader
In office
January 3, 1981 – January 3, 1987
Deputy Alan Cranston
Preceded by Howard Baker
Succeeded by Bob Dole
Senate Majority Whip
In office
January 3, 1971 – January 3, 1977
Leader Mike Mansfield
Preceded by Ted Kennedy
Succeeded by Alan Cranston
Chairman of the
Senate Committee on Appropriations
In office
January 3, 2007 – January 3, 2009
Preceded by Thad Cochran
Succeeded by Daniel Inouye
In office
June 6, 2001 – January 3, 2003
Preceded by Ted Stevens
Succeeded by Ted Stevens
In office
January 3, 2001 – January 20, 2001
Preceded by Ted Stevens
Succeeded by Ted Stevens
In office
January 3, 1989 – January 3, 1995
Preceded by John C. Stennis
Succeeded by Mark Hatfield
United States Senator
from West Virginia
In office
January 3, 1959 – June 28, 2010
Preceded by Chapman Revercomb
Succeeded by Carte Goodwin
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from West Virginia's 6th district
In office
January 3, 1953 – January 3, 1959
Preceded by Erland Hedrick
Succeeded by John Slack
Personal details
Born Cornelius Calvin Sale, Jr.
November 20, 1917(1917-11-20)
North Wilkesboro, North Carolina, U.S.
Died June 28, 2010(2010-06-28) (aged 92)
Falls Church, Virginia, U.S.
Political party Democratic Party
Spouse(s) Erma James (1937–2006)
Children Mona
Marjorie
Alma mater Marshall University
American University
Profession Attorney
Religion Baptist[1]
Signature

Robert Carlyle Byrd (November 20, 1917 – June 28, 2010) was a Senator of the state of West Virginia from 1959 until his death in 2010. He is the longest Senator in United States History.[2] He was dean of the United States Senate from 2003 to 2010. He was President pro tempore four times. He was elected to the Senate in 1958. He served as majority leader from 1977 to 1981 and again from 1987 to 1989. He was also minority leader from 1981 to 1987.

Early life[change | change source]

Byrd was born on November 20, 1917 in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina.[3] He was married to Erma James from 1937 until her death in 2006. They had two children.

Political career[change | change source]

Byrd was fourth person in the state (as President pro tempore of the Senate, usually longest serving Senator from majority party) from January 1989 to January 1995, from January 3, 2001 to January 20, 2001 and again from June 2001 to January 2003 and January 2007 until his death in 2010.

After Republicans retook control of the Senate, he became the honorary President "pro tempore emeritus" In 2007, Byrd became President Pro Tempore of the Senate again. Before he was elected to the Senate he served in the U.S. House of Representatives from 1953 until 1959 (he is dean of all Congress).

He was a vocal opponent of President George W. Bush's war in Iraq. In January 2006 he was one of the only four (alongside Ben Nelson of Nebraska, Kent Conrad of North Dakota and Ken Salazar of Colorado) democratic Senators, who voted for Samuel Alito.

Death[change | change source]

Byrd died on June 28, 2010 in Falls Church, Virginia, aged 92[4] from natural causes.

References[change | change source]