Robert Culp

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Robert Culp

Robert Culp in September 1965.
Born Robert Martin Culp
August 16, 1930(1930-08-16)
Oakland, California, U.S.
Died March 24, 2010(2010-03-24) (aged 79)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Cause of death Heart Attack
Nationality American
Education Berkeley High School
Alma mater University of Washington School of Drama
Occupation Actor, scriptwriter, director
Years active 1953–2010
Spouse Elayne Carroll (1951–1956)
Nancy Ashe (1957–1966)
France Nguyen (1967–1970)
Sheila Sullivan (1971–1976)
Candace Faulkner
(1981–2010)
Website
http://www.robertculponline.com/

Robert Martin Culp (August 16, 1930 – March 24, 2010) was an American actor, scriptwriter, voice actor and director.

Early life[change | change source]

Culp was born in Oakland, California, and graduated from Berkeley High School,[1] where he was a pole vaulter, taking second place at the 1947 CIF California State Meet.[2] He attended the University of the Pacific, Washington University in St. Louis, San Francisco State University, and the University of Washington School of Drama, but never completed an academic degree.

Career[change | change source]

Culp is widely known for his work in television.[3] Culp first earned an international reputation for his role as Kelly Robinson on I Spy (1965–1968), the espionage series in which he and co-star Bill Cosby played a pair of secret agents. The 1980's brought him back to TV again, starring as FBI Agent Bill Maxwell on The Greatest American Hero. He also had a recurring role as Warren Whelan on Everybody Loves Raymond.[4] In all, Culp gave hundreds of performances in a career spanning more than 50 years.

Personal life[change | change source]

Culp married five times and was the father of three sons, Joshua (1958), Jason (1961) and Joseph (1963), and two daughters, Rachel (1964) and Samantha (1982).[4] From 1967 to 1970, he was married to Eurasian actress France Nguyen, whom he had met when she guest-starred on I Spy. She appeared in four episodes, two of them written by Culp himself.

Culp wrote scripts for a total of seven episodes, one of which he also directed. He also wrote scripts for other television series, including Trackdown, The Rifleman and The Greatest American Hero.

Death[change | change source]

Culp died on March 24, 2010 while suffering a heart attack while taking a walk in Los Angeles, California. Culp's remains were buried in the Sunset View Cemetery in El Cerrito, California, located not far from his hometown of Oakland.

References[change | change source]

Other websites[change | change source]