Royal Palace of Madrid

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Royal Palace of Madrid
Palacio Real de Madrid

Royal Palace of Madrid, east facade
Royal Palace of Madrid is located in Madrid
Location within Madrid
General information
Architectural style Baroque, Classicism
Town or city Madrid
Country Spain
Coordinates 40°25′05″N 3°42′51″W / 40.417974°N 3.714302°W / 40.417974; -3.714302
Construction started April 7, 1738
Technical details
Floor area 135,000 m2 (1,450,000 sq ft)
Design and construction
Client Philip V of Spain
Architect Filippo Juvarra (first of many)
Official name: Palacio Real de Madrid
Type: Non-movable
Criteria: Monument
Designated: 1931[1]
Reference #: RI-51-0001061
The Palacio Real

The Palacio Real de Madrid (Royal Palace of Madrid) is the official home of the King of Spain. It is located in Madrid, Spain. It is one of the largest palaces in western Europe. With a surface of 135,000 km2 and 2,800 rooms, is the biggest royal palace in the whole of Europe.

King Felipe V had the palace built to replace the Alcazar that was burned down. It is made of limestone and granite. It was supposed to look a little like the Versailles Palace in Paris, France. Juan Bautista Sachetti was in charge of building the palace. They started to build it in 1738. King Carlos III moved into the palace in 1764. It took a hundred years to decorate all the rooms.

Spanish kings lived there until 1931 when King Alfonso XIII was forced to leave Spain. The Royal Palace is still used for special ceremonies. Letizia was supposed to walk on a red carpet from the Royal Palace to the cathedral for the wedding with Prince Felipe but it rained so she was taken in car.

Fifty of the rooms in the palace are open for public visits. Visitors enter the palace from the Plaza de la Armería. Some of the rooms that can be seen are: the 'porcelain' room, 'throne' room and 'clock' room. There is a royal army museum in the palace.

Location[change | change source]

The Almudena Cathedral is nearby the palace.

The Royal Alcazar of Madrid was originally on the site.

References[change | change source]