Samuel de Champlain

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Samuel de Champlain

Detail from "Deffaite des Yroquois au Lac de Champlain," from Champlain's Voyages (1613). This is the only contemporary likeness of the explorer to survive to the present. It is also a self-portrait.[1]
Born between 1567 and 1580
(most probably near 1580)
Brouage, Province of Saintonge, France
Died December 25, 1635
Quebec, Canada, New France
Occupation navigator, cartographer, soldier, explorer, administrator and chronicler of New France
Known for exploration of New France, foundation of Quebec City, Canada, being called The Father of New France
Signature

Samuel de Champlain (c. 1567 – December 25, 1635), IPA: [samɥɛl də ʃɑ̃plɛ̃], was a French navigator, cartographer, draughtsman, soldier, explorer, geographer, ethnologist, diplomat and chronicler. He is called "The Father of New France". He founded Quebec City on July 3, 1608.

Lake Champlain is named in his honor.

References[change | edit source]

  1. Fischer, p. 3