The Guardian

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The Guardian is a British newspaper. It is published every day, except on Sunday. The Sunday edition is known as The Observer. The Guardian is edited by Alan Rusbridger.

History[change | change source]

The Guardian archive

The newspaper was founded in 1821. It was founded by textile traders and merchants. The Guardian was seen as "an organ of the middle class"[1], or, in the words of C.P. Scott's son Ted, "a paper that will remain bourgeois to the last".[2] In 2005, Sir Max Hastings stated that he writes for The Guardian "because it is read by the new establishment", reflecting the paper's growing influence.[3]

Until 1959 The Guardian was called The Manchester Guardian.

Three of the four people who wrote leaders for the Guardian joined the Social Democratic Party on its foundation in 1982. The paper supported Tony Blair when he wanted to lead the Labour Party[4] and to become Prime Minister.[5]

In 1999 theguardian.com started.

The Observer[change | change source]

The Observer is the Sunday edition of The Guardian, mostly the same except with a different name.

Characteristics[change | change source]

The Guardian describes itself as centre-left.[6]

References[change | change source]

  1. Friedrich Engels, The Condition of the Working Class in England, Progress, 1973, p 109
  2. Ayerst, The Guardian, 1971, p.471
  3. Seddon, Mark (21 February 2005). "Smaller Size, Higher Brow?". New Statesman. http://www.newstatesman.com/node/149988. Retrieved 6 October 2013.
  4. Guardian leader, 2 July 1994
  5. Guardian leader, 2 May 1997
  6. Wells, Matt (16 October 2004). "World writes to undecided voters". The Guardian. http://www.theguardian.com/world/2004/oct/16/uselections2004.usa2. Retrieved 6 October 2013.

Other Websites[change | change source]