The WB

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The WB
Type Defunct broadcast television network (1995–2006)
Defunct online network (2008–2013)
Country United States
Availability National
Founded by Jamie Kellner
Owner Warner Bros. Entertainment (Time Warner)[1]
Key people Susanne Daniels,
Jordan Levin,
David Janollari,
Robert Bibb,
Lewis Goldstein
Launch date January 11, 1995 (1995-01-11) (television)
April 28, 2008 (2008-04-28) (online)
Dissolved September 17, 2006 (television)
December 2013 (online)
Replaced by The CW (terrestrial broadcasting)
Warner Bros. Television Media to Go (online)

The Warner Bros. Television Network, commonly called The WB, was a television network in the United States. It was founded by the Warner Bros. film studio and Tribune Company on January 11, 1995. The network was sometimes called "The Frog" because the network's mascot was an animated frog named Michigan J. Frog.

On January 24, 2006, CBS Corporation and Warner Bros. Entertainment said they were going to start The CW Television Network in the Fall of 2006. This new network would have programming from both The WB and UPN. The WB shut down on September 17, 2006.

WB series[change | change source]

The WB created many well-known television series. Several of these series are Dawson's Creek, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Charmed, Gilmore Girls, Angel, Smallville, 7th Heaven, and Supernatural.

The WB also had a group of programs aimed at children under the name Kids WB. Kids WB showed mainly animated series, for example, Jackie Chan Adventures, Taz-Mania, Tiny Toon Adventures, Animaniacs, Pinky and the Brain and Batman: The Animated Series.

References[change | change source]

  1. Sources vary as to the exact composition of The WB's ownership. According to at least one source, as of 2001, the ownership was split among Warner Bros. (Time Warner) (64%), Tribune Company (25%), and Jamie Kellner's firm ACME Communications (11%) [1]. Published reports in early 2006, dealing with the launch of The CW, suggested Tribune was at the time the only minority shareholder, with just 22.5% (giving Warner Bros. 77.5%), which it would be relinquishing in order to avoid shutdown costs for The WB.[2]