Thomson's Gazelle

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Thomson's Gazelle
Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Artiodactyla
Family: Bovidae
Subfamily: Antilopinae
Genus: Gazella
Species: G. thomsonii
Binomial name
Gazella thomsonii
Günther, 1884

The Thomson's gazelle (Gazella thomsonii) is the most common gazelle in East Africa. It is named after explorer Joseph Thomson and, as a result, is sometimes referred to as a "tommie", they can be found on ranches and farmland throughout East Africa, and persist long after other species have been killed off or migrated away.

Description[change | change source]

Thomson's gazelles are commonly referred to as "tommies". Tommies stand at about half a meter (22-26 inches) tall and weigh in between 15 and 25 kilograms (35-55 pounds). Although very similar in appearance to the Grant's gazelle, they have some distinguishing features.

Predators[change | change source]

The tommy has adapted to drier life on the open plains of East Africa, primarily in southern Kenya and northern Tanzania. Although tommies have many predators, including cheetahs, lions, leopards, and hyenas, they are frequently the last animals left on an abandoned ranch or farmland.