Tokyo Sky Tree

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Tokyo Sky Tree
東京スカイツリー

Tokyo Sky Tree under construction in March 2011
General information
Status Complete
Type Broadcast, restaurant, and observation tower
Location Sumida, Tokyo, Japan
Coordinates 35°42′36.5″N 139°48′39″E / 35.710139°N 139.81083°E / 35.710139; 139.81083Coordinates: 35°42′36.5″N 139°48′39″E / 35.710139°N 139.81083°E / 35.710139; 139.81083
Construction started 14 July 2008
Completed 29 February 2012
Opening 22 May 2012 (2012-05-22)
Cost 65 billion JPY (806 million USD)[1]
Height
Antenna spire 634.0 m (2,080 ft)
Roof 495.0 m (1,624 ft)
Top floor 451.2 m (1,480 ft)
Technical details
Elevators 13
Design and construction
Owner Tobu Tower Sky Tree Co., Ltd.
Main contractor Obayashi Corp.
Architect Nikken Sekkei
Developer Tobu Railway
Website
www.tokyo-skytree.jp/english/

Tokyo Sky Tree (東京スカイツリー Tōkyō Sukai Tsurī?), formerly known as New Tokyo Tower (新東京タワー Shin Tōkyō Tawā?), is a broadcasting, restaurant, and observation tower in Sumida, Tokyo, Japan. The nearest train station is Oshiage.

Tokyo Sky Tree is the tallest structure in Japan.[2] Its height is 634 m (2,080 ft).[3] In part, this height was chosen because it could be easily remembered. The figures 6 (mu), 3 (sa), 4 (shi) stand for Musashi Province, which is an old name of the region where the Tokyo Sky Tree stands.[4]

It is the second tallest structure in the world after Burj Khalifa (829.84 m/2,723 ft) in Dubai.[5]

All of central Tokyo can be seen from special viewing platforms at 350 m (1,150 ft) and 450 m (1,480 ft).[5] At night, it is lit up with different coloured lights.

History[change | change source]

The process of building the tower began in 2008. The project was completed on 29 February 2012.[5]

Emperor Akihito visited the tower in advance of its official opening.[6]

Opening ceremonies are planned for 22 May 2012.[7]

References[change | change source]

  1. http://www.mmtimes.com/2012/business/617/biz61714.html
  2. Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, "Japan Finishes World's Tallest Communications Tower," 1 March 2012; retrieved 2012-4-26.
  3. "What 'Lost Decade'?" New York Times. Jaunuary 7, 2012; retrieved 2012-4-26.
  4. Japan National Tourist Organization (JNTO), "A new famous Tokyo spot linking information and the soul of Japan to the next generation"; retrieved 2012-4-26.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Agence France-Presse (AFP). "Japan finishes world's tallest communications tower," Bangkok Post. February 29, 2012; retrieved 2012-4-26.
  6. "Japanese Emperor visits Tokyo Sky Tree ahead of opening," Xinhua. April 26, 2012; retrieved 2012-04-26.
  7. Nakata, Hiroko, "Tokyo Sky Tree opener looms large," Japan Times, 21 February 2012; retrieved 2012-4-26.

Other websites[change | change source]

Media related to Tokyo Sky Tree at Wikimedia Commons