TrES-4b

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The size of TrES-4b compared to Jupiter

TrES-4b (also called TrES-4) is an exoplanet. It orbits around the star GSC 02620-00648. The planet is 4.5 million miles from its sun. Being this close to its sun, the year on TrES-4b about three days long.[1][2] This makes the temperature on the planet very hot. In fact, the temperature on TrES-4b is about 2,300 degrees Fahrenheit (1,260 degrees Celsius).[1]

TrES-4b is a gas giant that is 70 percent bigger than Jupiter.[1][3] However, the planet is only as dense as cork.[1] At the time of its discovery, TrES-4b was the largest known planet in the universe.

Discovery[change | change source]

The planet was found by Georgi Mandushev at the Lowell Observatory in Arizona.[4] Mandushev discovered the planet as a part of the Trans-Atlantic Exoplanet Survey project.[5]

TrES-4b was discovered using the transit method. When an exoplanet passes between its sun and the Earth, astronomers can see a change in light from the star.

References[change | change source]

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 Minard, Anne (2011 [last update]). "Largest Known Planet Found, Has Density of Cork". news.nationalgeographic.com. http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/08/070808-largest-planet.html. Retrieved 6 February 2011.
  2. "Largest Known Exoplanet Discovered | Space.com". space.com. 2011 [last update]. http://www.space.com/4151-largest-exoplanet-discovered.html. Retrieved 6 February 2011.
  3. Miller, Barbara (2011 [last update]). "New monster planet 'could float on water' - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)". abc.net.au. http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/08/08/1999558.htm?section=justin. Retrieved 6 February 2011.
  4. Mandushev, Georgi; et al. (2007). "TrES-4: A Transiting Hot Jupiter of Very Low Density". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 667: L195–L198. doi:10.1086/522115 .
  5. "Largest known exoplanet puzzles astronomers - space - 06 August 2007 - New Scientist". newscientist.com. 2011 [last update]. http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn12430. Retrieved 6 February 2011.