University of Bologna

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
University of Bologna
Università di Bologna
Latin: Universitas Bononiensis
Motto Alma mater studiorum (Latin)
Motto in English Nourishing mother of the studies
Established 1088
Type Public
Rector Ivano Dionigi
Academic staff 2,850
Students 82,363
Undergraduates 52,787
Postgraduates 29,576
Location Bologna, Italy
Campus Urban
Sports teams CUSB
Affiliations Coimbra Group, Utrecht Network
Website unibo.it

The University of Bologna is the second-oldest university in continuous operation, after Qarawiyin university. It was founded in Bologna, Italy in about 1088.[1]

The university received a charter from Frederick I Barbarossa in 1158. In the 19th century, a committee of historians traced the founding of the University back to 1088, which would make it the oldest continuous university in the world.[2][3][4] That is slightly earlier than the University of Oxford, where there is evidence of teaching in 1096. [5]

Bologna was also the first to use the term universitas for the corporation of students and masters which make up a university.

History[change | change source]

In the Middle Ages, the University of Bologna was famous in all Europe for its schools of humanities and law.

The poets Dante and Petrarca studied at this university. Called officially Alma mater studiorum, the university is an institution for students of both sexes, supported by the state. It offers courses in arts, law, medicine, pharmacy, mathematics, engineering, agronomy, veterinary medicine and pedagogy. The Italian semiologist and writer Umberto Eco is the holder of the chair of semiotics at the university. The former prime minister of Italy, Romano Prodi, is a professor in the Department of Economics.

References[change | change source]

  1. La nostra storia (our history): University of Bologna. [1]
  2. Top Universities World University Rankings Retrieved 2010-1-6
  3. Our History - Università di Bologna
  4. Paul L. Gaston (2010). The Challenge of Bologna. pp. 18. ISBN 1-57922-366-4 .
  5. "A Brief History of the University". University of Oxford. http://www.ox.ac.uk/about_the_university/introducing_oxford/a_brief_history_of_the_university/index.html. Retrieved 30 October 2007.

Other websites[change | change source]