Victoria Cross

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The Victoria Cross

The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest military medal given for bravery "in the face of the enemy" to members of the defence forces of Commonwealth countries, and former British Empire territories. It is the most important medal, more important than all other orders, decorations and medals.[1]

It may be given to a person of any rank in any service (army, navy or air force) or anyone working for the military. It is usually presented to the person, or a family member if they were killed, by the British monarch during a ceremony at Buckingham Palace. It can be presented by the Governor-General for awards made by other Commonwealth countries.

It is the joint highest medal for bravery in the United Kingdom with the George Cross, which is for bravery not in the face of the enemy. However, the VC is higher in the order of importance and would be worn first by a person who had been given both medals (which has not happened).[2]

The VC was begun on 29 January 1856 by Queen Victoria for acts of bravery during the Crimean War. Since then, the medal has been given 1,356 times to 1,353 people. Only 13 medals, nine to members of the British Army, and four to the Australian Army have been presented since the Second World War.

Since 1990, Australia, New Zealand and Canada, have started their own versions of the VC. Because of this, the Victoria Cross is sometimes called the "British Victoria Cross"[3] or the "Imperial Victoria Cross".[4]

Living holders of the Victoria Cross[change | change source]

The list of living holders of the Victoria Cross is small.[5]

This list is not finished; you can help Wikipedia by adding to it.

Related pages[change | change source]

References[change | change source]